The Great Tapestry of Scotland has come to the famous Wemyss School of Needlework

The Great Tapestry of Scotland at the Wemyss School of Needlework. Co-ordinator Dorie Wilkie, Stitcher Meg Murray, Manager Louise Foster, Tutor Helen McCook and artist/designer Andrew Crummy.
The Great Tapestry of Scotland at the Wemyss School of Needlework. Co-ordinator Dorie Wilkie, Stitcher Meg Murray, Manager Louise Foster, Tutor Helen McCook and artist/designer Andrew Crummy.
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SOME of Fife’s most dedicated stitchers came together recently for a special project at the Weymss School of Needlework.

Artist Andrew Crummy visited the historic school, which was founded in 1877 by Dora Weymss, as part of the Great Tapestry of Scotland project, along with Helen McCook from the famous Royal School of Needlework in London.

They were there to see how local work on a giant tapestry is coming along.

It will tell the story of key events in Scotlasnd’s history in 160 panels.

The project is the brainchild of Scottish writer Alexander McCall Smith.

Together with historian Alistair Moffat and artist Andrew, and stitchers from all over Scotland, they are set to produce one of the world’s longest embroidered tapestries as part of one of the biggest community arts projects ever to take place in Scotland.

For Andrew, it was an opportunity to meet some of the people contributing to the artwork.

“It was a great day,” he said. “There was lots of people who all brought their panels together, and being at the Weymss School of Needlework was really lovely. It was definitely a successful trip.”

The tapestry will feature a range of embroidery skills and over 30 miles of woollen yarn to translate

Andrew’s descriptive artwork into a colourful, skilful and textural depiction of the history of Scotland.

Over 500 stitchers from all over Scotland will work for more than 400 hours per panel, and the completed piece is expected to be over 140 meters long.

It will debut in an exhibition at the Scottish Parliament in the auutumn.

“It is always humbling to see the design come to life and it is really good for all the people involved to come together,” said Andrew.

“All of the ladies on Saturday were very excited about representing Fife in the tapestry because they are all proud of where they are from.”

And Fife will definitely leave its mark on this historic piece of art, from Adam Smith to the Forth Road Bridge and the founding of St Andrews University in 1413.

For 136 years, the Weymss School of Needlework has been cared for and run by the Weymss family and seamstresses.

Fiona Weymss commented: “We are so pleased to have the Great Tapestry of Scotland here and see the Wemyss School alive and buzzing again.”