100 not out for Kinghorn champion

Violet Langham celebrates 100th birthday with Alan McIlravie, Provost of Kinghorn and Bob Crewes, chairman of the community centre
Violet Langham celebrates 100th birthday with Alan McIlravie, Provost of Kinghorn and Bob Crewes, chairman of the community centre

The leap year of 1916 was a year beset by conflict. The Easter Rising in Ireland caused the death of many, the First World War had stalled and Scotland’s civilians got their first taste of the bitterness of war.

Two German zeppelins failed to find the dockyard at Rosyth dropping bombs on the docks at Leith and the city of Edinburgh.

The summer Olympics, due to be staged in Berlin, were cancelled and the whole world seemed to be under a cloud of despair.

But, on October 6 in Leith, there was cause to celebrate when a little girl called Violet made her way in to the bright light of an early autumnal day.

One hundred years later, Violet Langham celebrated one of the most momentous of anniversaries in the company of her family and friends, firstly with friends at Balbirnie, then with family at a party in the Old Manor in Lundin Links with her three children, nine grandchildren and great grandchildren.

Violet came to Kinghorn with her husband and three sons, Arthur, Ian and Leslie in 1967 when Cyril was appointed a plant manager at the thriving bottle works in Pettycur, where he served until he retired.

She and her family immersed themselves in the life of Kinghorn where she was well known as an accomplished bowler, a keen hiker and a volunteer for 25 years at the former ‘drop-in’ facility for Kinghorn’s OAPs.

She only recently moved in with her son Arthur and his wife in Kirkcaldy.

Bob Crewes, chairman of the community centre and a former employee at the bottle works, and Community Council Provost Alan McIlravie dropped in to visit Violet on her birthday for a cuppa.