A92 - one year on from Logan tragedy

Robert Brown visits the site where his grandson Logan Carrie (9) was killed in an accident on the A92 while he was walking home.
Robert Brown visits the site where his grandson Logan Carrie (9) was killed in an accident on the A92 while he was walking home.
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A grandfather has used the first anniversary of his grandson’s tragic death to once again call on the Scottish Government to make safe the A92.

Robert Brown, whose nine-year-old grandson Logan Carrie was killed whilst crossing a notorious stretch of the A92 near his Cadham home in the early evening of February 10 last year, told the Gazette that whilst the road remains unchanged, lives of both pedestrians and motorists are continuing to be put at risk.

Mr Brown has vowed to fight “until his last breath” for safety improvements on the busy trunk road north of Glenrothes and to ensure the tragic loss of his grandson would not be in vain.

He met with transport Scotland and BEAR Scotland representatives last week following the completion of a draft assessment of the safety concerns and possible solutions close to Cadham and Balfarg junctions.

“Progress has been slower than we would have hoped for, but a two hour meeting with senior officials was productive,” said Mr Brown.

“Once we deal with the emotions that this week will inevitably bring, we will be responding with my ideas and input to the draft assessment.

“One thing we will be insisting on is some sort of pedestrian crossing either close to where Logan was killed or close to Cadham.

“There is a desire to direct people wanting to cross the carriageway up towards the Balfarg junction but human nature is such that people are unlikely to walk that distance and will instead cross at the most convenient point.

“Nobody has yet asked pedestrians where they want to cross the A92.”

In the 75 page draft assessment seen by the Gazette, recommendations include the reduction of the speed limit from 50mph to 40mph, improvement to existing footpaths and the removal of trees, and further investigation into carriageway widening.

However the report also stated that because of the low number of collisions in the immediate area close to where Logan lost his life, a crossing in that area was unlikely to vastly improve the collision rate.