Another four years to recover St Andrews mine victim’s body?

Malcolm Campbell from st andrews who is trapped underground in a mine mining accident in New Zealand'collect photo by dave scott
Malcolm Campbell from st andrews who is trapped underground in a mine mining accident in New Zealand'collect photo by dave scott
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The parents of Malcolm Campbell, the young Cameron man tragically killed in a New Zealand mining disaster, have been left devastated by the news that it could take four years to recover their son’s body.

The heartbreaking news comes as Jane and Malcolm Campbell spend some time with their daughter, Kerry, in Australia.

Family and friends of the victims are continuing with their fundraising events to boost the recovery fund after it was revealed the mine was too unstable to enter at the moment.

But according to recent reports in New Zealand, the receiver now in charge of the mine has said it could take between two and four years to recover the bodies of the 29 men who were killed.

Speaking to the Citizen this week, Jane Campbell spoke about this latest set back while again thanking friends and family for their continued support.

“The news that the recovery could take up to four years is just devastating,’’ she added.

“While out here in Australia, my brother, James, and his wife, Tania, organised a bike run for the recovery fund.

‘‘It raised 7000 dollars, we met some great people and Doug White - who was Malcolm’s mine manager - flew in from Queensland to take part.

“I suppose a lot of people will be thinking that there will be no bodies to recover. However, the mine has no oxygen so the bodies are intact and will not decompose as would be the norm.

“Bottom line is that we just want our son laid to rest back in Scotland - the torture is never ending.

“We would like to thank everyone for all their support.”

Malcolm died along with 28 others in a series of explosions that began on November 19, 2010, at the Pike River mine at Greymouth.

The mine was sealed because of safety fears before any of the victim’s bodies could be recovered.

An inquiry into the disaster, which opened in Greymouth in April last year, is expected to end shortly with a final report due to be published in March.