Bobbies make a return to the beat

The North East Fife community police team for St Andrews, Taybridgehead and East Neuk, from left Susan Martin,  Norrie Hill, Gillian Tetlow, Sgt Pat Turner (community ward sergeant), Joanna Peddie and  David Johnstone. (Photo: Peter Adamson)
The North East Fife community police team for St Andrews, Taybridgehead and East Neuk, from left Susan Martin, Norrie Hill, Gillian Tetlow, Sgt Pat Turner (community ward sergeant), Joanna Peddie and David Johnstone. (Photo: Peter Adamson)
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It’s a return to good old-fashioned policing as Bobbies go back on the beat in north east Fife.

Six St Andrews-based police officers are now pounding the beat in the town, the Tay Bridgehead area, and the East Neuk and landward areas of Fife.

Community Ward Sergeant Pat Turner is in charge of the team and he explained: “There are two officers assigned to each area and they will be concentrating on where they are.

“This is about getting us back on the beat so that local people can identify their own ward officers. It’s going back to the old ways with a visible presence on the streets.”

The six, PCs Susan Martin and Norrie Hill in the Tay Bridgehead area, Joanna Peddie and David Johnstone in St Andrews and Strathkinness, and Gillian Tetlow and Tracy Elder in the East Neuk and landward area, will be on patrol in the towns and villages getting to know the local people and the issues that are affecting them.

They hope that the result will be to put measures in place to deal with local problems.

PC Tetlow explained: “We start the day in St Andrews and then head out to our areas and occasionally that’s using the local bus service, which is really helpful.

“We can sit on the bus and chat with people on the way to wherever we are heading for.

She reported: “Then we start walking our beat and already, after just a couple of weeks, people are starting to wave to us from the shops as we go by and approaching us to talk and keep in touch. After all,” she said, “it’s easier to talk to someone you know.”

PC Hill added: “Being on foot patrol is a good way of getting information from the community, people in the shops and cafes tell you about what’s going on.

“People are glad to see us out on the beat, there has been a good response already.”

PC Peddie said: “It’s nice to get into the community and speak to people - it’s about the personal touch.”