Fife’s renewables role

Graham Monaghan, Project Engineer for BI Fab's Britannia Monocolumn project shows Patrick Harvie MSP, Mike MacKenzie MSP and Murdo Fraser MSP around their fabrication plant in Methil.
Graham Monaghan, Project Engineer for BI Fab's Britannia Monocolumn project shows Patrick Harvie MSP, Mike MacKenzie MSP and Murdo Fraser MSP around their fabrication plant in Methil.

FIFE is playing a major role in efforts to enable Scotland to generate 100 per cent of its electricity from renewable resources by 2020.

The Scottish Parliament’s economy, energy and tourism committee has launched an inquiry into the achievability of the Scottish Government’s target.

As part of the inquiry, MSPs visited BiFab and Adam Smith College to find out about their involvement in equipping the future workforce with the right skills to meet the anticipated growth in the renewable energy industry.

BiFab, based in Methil, has produced major fabrications for the offshore oil and gas industry for many years.

Its diversification into the offshore energy sector has seen it emerge as a major contractor for renewable projects.

John Robertson, BiFab managing director, said: “We are a leading manufacturer in the oil and gas sector and we continue to transfer our skills and expertise to the renewables sector covering wind, wave and tidal.”

Committee members also met staff and students at the Future Skills Centre at Adam Smith College in Glenrothes, a £17.5m development bringing together engineering, construction, renewables and science, with renewable energy and low carbon technologies at its heart.

Murdo Fraser MSP, the committee convener, said: “For Scotland to be at the forefront of the renewable energy revolution, our future workforce must have the right mix of skills.

“A key part of our inquiry is determining if the renewables industry is geared up to meet these challenging targets. Having the right workforce with the right skills, will be absolutely critical to this.”