Call for council to buy Leven eyesore

Cllr Davidson wants the Council to purchase the Three Ways Inn if a developer doesn't. (Pic: George McLuskie)
Cllr Davidson wants the Council to purchase the Three Ways Inn if a developer doesn't. (Pic: George McLuskie)

Fife Council has been called on to purchase a Leven eyesore if developers don’t.

As the area prepares to undergo a £1 million regeneration, Councillor Colin Davidson says the local authority should buy and demolish the Three Ways Inn on North Street.

The building, which has been empty for years, is currently up for auction, after pub giant Wetherspoon decided against revamping the site, and is now listed as available for £62,500.

Cllr Davidson said it was a “huge disappointment” that Wetherspoon had pulled out but said action needed to be taken soon.

“If no one is forthcoming before the next auction, we should look to purchase it.

“It’s a matter of urgency.

“What they are asking for is not that expensive.”

North Street and Shorehead are set to benefit from a £1 million regeneration which will include high quality pavements, lower kerbing and better lighting.

The project also includes a reconfiguration of the Shorehead car park, which could lead to public events being staged there.

It is also hoped the regeneration will boost the amount of people coming from the retail park to visit the high street – a route which passes the Three Ways Inn.

Cllr Davidson also expressed concern that, following the fire at Denbeath Miners Welfare Club, the derelict Three Ways Inn could suffer a similar fate.

He added: “My first hope would be that a developer buys it and develops it with support from the council.

“But if that doesn’t happen in the next two to three months, we should buy it and develop it.”

Cllr Davidson said his main focus was on the building being demolished, but said that it could be used for housing.

He added: “Fife Council is committed to building 3000 houses in the next five years.

“This would be an ideal site for housing.”

The pub was purchased by Wetherspoon in 2015, but earlier this year the company decided against developing the building because Leven was “too small”.