Communities pay tribute to fallen

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People from Kirkcaldy and neighbouring towns turned out to pay their respects in the annual Remembrance Day ceremonies on Sunday.

Communities from Kirkcaldy, Burntisland, Kinghorn, Aberdour and Cardenden honoured those who bravely gave their lives for their country in services made more poignant as this year marked the centenary of the outbeak of World War One.

Wreaths at Kirkcaldy War Memorial. Pic: FPA

Wreaths at Kirkcaldy War Memorial. Pic: FPA

Record numbers of local people of all ages joined the parades to pay respect to those from the armed forces past and present.

Around 1000 people marched to the War Memorial in Kirkcaldy, where representatives from Fife Police, Fife Council, local politicians , ex-servicemen’s organisations and local Brownies, Guides, Scouts and Cub units paid their respects.

The parade then headed to the Adam Smith Theatre where the ceremony continued with readings by pupils from the town’s four secondary schools, as well as songs and music from the era.

Councillor Neil Crooks, chairman of the Kirkcaldy area committee, which organised the ceremony together with the British Legion Scotland, said: “The feedback from those who attended at the theatre was very positive – we had to set out more tables to accomodate the crowd.

“The choir from the four secondary schools led by Balwearie rector James More was excellent.

‘‘The tributes to the fallen KHS students and staff were immaculately delivered and the utter silence in the hall showed the impact and respect of the audience.”

Kirkcaldy man Lawrence remembers

A former soldier from Kirkcaldy attended the remembrance service at the Cenotaph in London on Sunday.

Kirkcaldy man Lawrence McLaren at the Cenotaph in London on Remembrance Sunday

Kirkcaldy man Lawrence McLaren at the Cenotaph in London on Remembrance Sunday

Lawrence McLaren was born in the Lang Toun in 1933.

The eldest of five children, he lived in the town until he joined the Black Watch in 1950 and was posted to Korea and Kenya.

When in Korea, he took part in the Battle of the Hook as a signalman. He left the Black Watch in 1955 and continued to visit an ever-growing family back in Kirkcaldy over the years, from his new home of Canterbury.

Kirkcaldy man Lawrence McLaren at the Cenotaph in London on Remembrance Sunday

Kirkcaldy man Lawrence McLaren at the Cenotaph in London on Remembrance Sunday