Costumed charity supporters are a cut above the rest

Leven - 'Staff from Sheree's, Kerry Lonie, Debbie Lawson and Sheree Cherrett  handover cheque to Caroline Duncan -'credit - FPA -
Leven - 'Staff from Sheree's, Kerry Lonie, Debbie Lawson and Sheree Cherrett handover cheque to Caroline Duncan -'credit - FPA -
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Caring hairdressing staff in Leven turned on the style when it came to supporting a young boy who has a rare form of muscular dystrophy.

Employees at Sheree’s in the town centre spent three days in fancy dress, collecting donations from customers, to help Shaun Duncan (10), of Methilhill, who has Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

Staff from Sheree's - Kerry Lonie, left, Debbie Lawson and Sheree Cherrett, right, present a cheque to Caroline Duncan, second left (FPA)

Staff from Sheree's - Kerry Lonie, left, Debbie Lawson and Sheree Cherrett, right, present a cheque to Caroline Duncan, second left (FPA)

They had heard of his plight from his grandmother, Caroline Duncan, and, as regular charity supporters, decided to make Action Duchenne their chosen cause this time.

They raised over £320 and boosted awareness of the condition, which has no cure.

Caroline said she was delighted, as was Shaun’s mum, Leanne, that the staff had gone out of their way to encourage contributions large and small to help the young Methilhill Primary School pupil.

Sheree Cherrett, boss at the Old Inn Wynd salon, with colleagues Kerry Lonie and Debbie Wilson, plus ex-staff Blair Curran and Leanne Cassell, were dressed as angels, fairies and elves to rally support. Sheree said: “We have great customers – they are just brilliant.”

The symptoms of muscular dystrophy, and their severity, vary depending on the particular condition and how old a child is when the symptoms first appear. Shaun Duncan was diagnosed in 2007 with Duchenne, the most severe type, which affects about one in 3500 boys. Complications include osteoporosis, obesity, respiratory failure and pneumonia, heart failure and learning difficulties in about a third of cases. By late teens or early 20s, Duchenne MD can develop to a stage where it causes breathing problems and is life-threatening.