Crail’s vital WWII training role celebrated

A Fairey Swordfish releasing a torpedo over the Firth of Forth. Photo from Crail Museum  Heritage Centre.

A Fairey Swordfish releasing a torpedo over the Firth of Forth. Photo from Crail Museum Heritage Centre.

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Crail Museum is to celebrate the 75th anniversary of HMS Jackdaw, the Royal Naval Air Station at Crail.

In 1940 the station was tasked with the specialised training of pilots and observers in the operational techniques of torpedo attack.

The training was not without danger - a number of young men were killed in crashes practising torpedo attacks on target ships in the Firth of Forth and others died in accidents ashore. A number are buried in Commonwealth War Graves in Crail Kirk Cemetery.

The Museum will mark the occasion with two events on Saturday. At 3pm there will be a small service by the war graves conducted by the Rev Gordon Craig, a former RN Chaplain who lives locally, after which wreaths will be laid on behalf of the RN, RNZN, Crail Museum, Crail Community Council and others.

At 7pm there will be a ‘Jackdaw’ evening in the Kirk Hall which will include talks by Stephen Prince, Head of the RN Historical Branch and Assistant Director of the Naval Staff, and by Naval Historian Commander David Hobbs.

For more email office@crailmuseum.org.uk