Temporary halt to blast monitoring at controversial Fife quarry

Fife Council have suspended for three months secondary monitoring of blasting at Lomond Quarry.
Fife Council have suspended for three months secondary monitoring of blasting at Lomond Quarry.

The secondary monitoring of blasts at a controversial quarry in Fife has been suspended for three months following an agreement by councillors.

Proposals put forward by Fife Council’s planning enforcement officers to Glenrothes Area Committee had suggested scrapping routine monitoring of blasting at Lomond Quarry on the outskirts of Leslie, in favour of random unannounced testing.

A report to councillors had urged they allow an amendment to the current monitoring regime to allow the cash strapped council to divert the costs to other areas.

The report concluded that a “significant body of evidence, collected over a number of years” indicated operations at Lomond Quarry continue to comply fully with both the planning conditions and environmental legislation.

Furthermore the activity at the site currently offered no statutory nuisance and was unlikely to do so in future.

The impact of blasting at the Skene Group–owned quarry has been the focus of much concern for residents since blasting for dolerite commenced at the site in 2011.

Councillor John Wincott, whose ward the quarry is in, assured residents that the situation would continue to be watched closely.

“At the meeting I proposed that this is only a temporary cessation of the secondary monitoring by Fife Council so that we can gauge whether there is any impact on the residents of Leslie,” said Mr Wincot

“After three months the officers will return to the Area Committee so that we can reassess the situation.”

While a cessation of monitoring has now been agreed, the owners will continue to provide its own regular monitoring of blasts to Fife Council.