Fife Council prepares for the long and winding load

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east Neuk residents will be next in line to receive Fife Council’s new four-bin recycling service.

Starting in March, households in the area which currently have three bins will move to the new four-bin set-up.

The council says the new service makes it even easier for householders to recycle all their cans, plastics and food waste, as well as paper, cardboard and garden waste.

However, the authority is well aware of the difficulty in some Neuk burghs with access to properties as well as the narrow streets and wynds – but it aims to deal with as many concerns as possible.

Some East Neuk householders feel four bins may be too tight a squeeze in some areas, while collection vehicles may struggle to gain access.

An environmental services representative is due to address February’s meetings of community councils in Anstruther and Elie to discuss the changes.

The four-bin service, already rolled out successfully to over 54,000 Fife households, introduces a fourth (green) bin for cans and plastics.

In addition, it lets householders recycle their food waste alongside garden waste in the brown bin, while the use of the blue and grey bins is swapped over.

Detailed information will start to drop through Neuk letterboxes from February but, in a move to ensure everyone has the bins they need to start the new service, blue and brown bins will start being delivered out from January to households moving over to the new service.

Martin Dibley, secretary of the community council serving Kilrenny, Anstruther and Cellardyke, said a lot of narrow streets there had no bins at all, because there was nowhere physiccaly for them to go.

Congestion was a worry, especially with the “ever-increasing” number of holiday homes.

He added: “I am sure Fife Council will try and be as good as it can with the bins’ system, but the physical architecture of the streets doesn’t accommodate them.”

Other community councils and preservation groups indicated they may discuss issues like storage, narrow street access, bins in strong winds, and their effect on the appearance of local burghs.