Fife’s path just got longer ...

Enjoying the view from Newburgh, Cllr Andrew Arbuckle, Cllr Donald Lothian, Cllr Margaret Taylor, Amanda McFarlane, chief executive of Fife Coast and Countryside, Cllr Ron Caird, Fife Ranger Kate Morison, Cllr Tim Bret, Cllr David MacDiarmid at the completion of the Fife Coastal Path
Enjoying the view from Newburgh, Cllr Andrew Arbuckle, Cllr Donald Lothian, Cllr Margaret Taylor, Amanda McFarlane, chief executive of Fife Coast and Countryside, Cllr Ron Caird, Fife Ranger Kate Morison, Cllr Tim Bret, Cllr David MacDiarmid at the completion of the Fife Coastal Path

The Fife Coastal Path is now the longest continuous coastal path in Scotland, stretching from Kincardine Bridge at the region’s western boundary to Newburgh in the north.

The path, which previously ended at the Tay Bridge, has been extended by 16.5 miles along the River Tay estuary to Newburgh.

Now, at 117 miles, not only is the path Scotland’s longest, it is the country’s oldest and most popular coastal walk.

The new extension follows the River Tay as well as taking to higher ground at some points.

Amanda McFarlane, chief executive of the Fife Coast and Countryside Trust, said: “The addition of the northern extension to the path is a great achievement for the Trust – it is the completion of a long-held ambition to deliver a coastal walk that starts and finishes at the Kingdom’s borders.

‘‘We would also like to thank all the landowners for their help and support, without them, the extension would not be possible.”