A stitch in time to help save lives

New members are always welcome at the Busy Hands group
New members are always welcome at the Busy Hands group
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A ‘close-knit’ group of Cupar friends have seen the fruits of their labour with the unveiling of the town’s first defibrillator to be accessible round the clock.

The aptly-named Busy Hands group at St John’s and Dairsie United Parish Church have used their sewing and knitting skills to raise money for the potentially life-saving device.

It has been installed on the front of the church in Bonnygate and is accessible by the public 24 hours a day.

The Busy Hands group was formed almost six years ago as a social group aimed at bringing sewing and kniting enthusiasts together.

Since then, it’s gone from strength to strength with a membership of more than 30, who produce knitted items including children’s clothing, hats, gloves and blankets.

Many of the items are sold at coffee mornings, while other items are sent to charities such as the annual Blythswood Shoe Box Appeal, which sends more than 120,000 shoes boxes to eastern European countries and Pakistan each year.

Since the group was founded it has raised more than £8000, which has been used improve facilities at the church for the many groups who use the building each week.

Now the ladies are aiming to raise enough funds to provide villagers in Dairsie with a defibrillator.

Said a spokesman: “It is important to give something back to our communities and we are delighted that we have been able to do this for Cupar.

“We are now raising funds to supply one for Dairsie.

“Busy Hands is open to anyone, come along for a chat a cup of tea, to knit and sew and share skills, we meet every Thursday, except the first Thursday of the month, from 2pm to 4pm in St John’s Church Hall.”

Meanwhile, another three defibrillators are soon to be installed in Cupar thanks to a charity football tournament held at Duffus Park recently that raised around £6500.

A defibrillator is a device that gives a high energy electric shock to the heart through the chest wall to someone who is in cardiac arrest.

There are many defibrillators available in public places such as train stations, shopping centres, airport and leisure centres.

Like the one just installed at St John’s, they are often known as public access defibrillators (PAD) as anyone can use them in an emergency.