Fife family’s efforts for air ambulance after rescue

Milly Morrison, Lesley Howat, owner of Kinnaird Cross Country in Dairsie and Fiona Morrison.   Photo credit: Andrews Elder.
Milly Morrison, Lesley Howat, owner of Kinnaird Cross Country in Dairsie and Fiona Morrison. Photo credit: Andrews Elder.
0
Have your say

A rapid response from Scotland’s Charity Air Ambulance (SCAA) helped get a Dairsie teenager to hospital after a nasty horse riding accident.

The experienced rider, who has since made a full recovery, had to be air lifted to hospital after she and the horse fell.

Milly Morrison and Fiona Morrison were delighted to raise �3120 from a chairty pick-a-fence event at Kinnair Cross Country for the Scottish Charity Air Ambulance and Burntisland First Aid Trust after Milly was involved in a serious horse accident last July.

Milly Morrison and Fiona Morrison were delighted to raise �3120 from a chairty pick-a-fence event at Kinnair Cross Country for the Scottish Charity Air Ambulance and Burntisland First Aid Trust after Milly was involved in a serious horse accident last July.

The land ambulance responded to the emergency call but estimated that the journey time to Ninewells would be too long, and called in the air ambulance.

“My daughter Milly, who is now 18, unfortunately had a serious riding accident last July resulting in her having to be airlifted from Fife to Ninewells Hospital,” said Milly’s mum Fiona Morrison. “After the helicopter had taken Milly we had to follow in the car.

“By the time we arrived at Ninewells in Dundee she had already been assessed and scanned.

“They got her from Fife to the hospital in seven minutes. It was absolutely miraculous. They were fantastic and I can’t thank them enough.”

Milly spent three weeks in hospital recovering from her injuries, but is now back in the saddle and competing. Fiona wanted to organise an event to raise awareness of the vital work undertaken by the air ambulance service.

“You cannot realise how important a service it is until you need it. And a lot of people will be unaware that it is funded entirely by donations,” she said.

The air ambulance costs approximately £2 million a year to run and does not receive any government funding.

Horseriding course owner Lesley Howatt offered Kinnaird Cross Country as a venue for the charity jumping event which took place at the Cupar grounds recently. Adult and junior riders paid to enter the ‘pick-a-fence’ in which they chose a fence height to jump in different categories. Hundreds of riders supported the event which raised £3120.

The money will be split between the SCAA and the Burntisland First Aid Trust.

Covering the whole of Scotland the air ambulance can reach 90 percent of populated areas within 30 minutes. Since its launch in May 2013 – manned by a pilot and two paramedics – it has flown the equivalents of four times round the earth.

“The people of Scotland have taken the cause to their hearts and are funding it and every penny helps us,” said Maureen Young, SCAA press manager.

Fiona added: “Burntisland First Aid Trust will receive half the money. They provide support at many events and their help really is invaluable. It is important we raise awareness of them to ensure people support the charity and allow them to continue with their vital work.” The group is run by first aid volunteers who attend events across the county and can be contacted via their website, www.bfast.org.uk.