High Street traffic prompts survey

Leven High Street, Leven, Fife
Leven High Street, Leven, Fife
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SHOPPERS, pedestrians and regular visitors to Leven High Street are to be quizzed about the volume of traffic using the main town centre route.

Leven Community Council aims to do its own survey on levels of congestion and the number of delivery vehicles making drop-offs to shops in the pedestrianised area.

Members have been concerned for some years about the number of vehicles making deliveries to the front entrances of shops which, in their view, had adequate space for goods to be delivered at the back.

The Community Council plans to make a newsletter with a questionnaire available to people at a ‘Getting To Know You’ event, being held at Levenmouth Swiming Pool and Sports Centre on September 24.

A public consultation on the same subject was carried out in July by Fife Council.

However, Community Council members felt it possibly focused too much on the views of shopkeepers and High Street residents, and was overly-concerned with delivery vehicles.

The Community Council also had worries about the number of ordinary vehicles and disabled badge-holding motorists using the pedestrian zone, and wanted to hear more thoughts from shoppers.

Fife Council’s survey sought to assess which vehicles should be permitted within the pedestrianised zone and at what times.

“Transportation and Environmental Services are keen to hear views from anyone who uses the High Street, including business owners and residents,” said the authority.

“There are no proposed alterations to the current access restrictions, but all views shared during the consultation will be taken into consideration when planning for the future.”

A letter-drop to interested groups was complemented by an on-line consultation, which invited “all residents, shoppers and business people in Leven” to participate.

Lead traffic management officer in Mid Fife, Ian Smith, said the response had been good, with 70 replies from a distribution of 120 letters, while the full analysis was still at an early stage.

Over 90 per cent of replies felt pedestrians should have priority over vehicles in the pedestrianised zone.

Two thirds of those who replied believed there was sufficient parking provision for shoppers in Leven town centre. Almost 80 per cent considered disabled parking was adequate - with 13 per cent of the responses from those with a disability.

Forty per cent of reactions came from those who operated a business in the pedestrianised area, where over 90 per cent of businesses could be accessed by disabled customers.

In contrast, just over half of businesses reported that service deliveries could only be made to their premises from the pedestrianised area.