I’ll fight to save my home

William Drysdale at his old house near Cluny
William Drysdale at his old house near Cluny
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A FIFE pensioner is campaigning to stop his family home on the outskirts of Kirkcaldy from being demolished.

William Drysdale (72) lived in Dothan Farmhouse for 57 years and is trying to stop a group behind the construction of a gospel hall from bulldozing the C-listed building and building a new farmhouse in its place.

New build

Kirkcaldy Gospel Trust, which wants to construct the hall on the other side of the Cluny Road, has lodged an application with Fife Council to knock the 150-year-old property down and replace it with a new build.

But Mr Drysdale, who now stays in Glenrothes, believes his former home should be kept and repaired.

He said: “This building is of architectural and historical importance and I strongly object to it being demolished.

“My father bought Dothan Farm in November 1944 and it was my home for 57 years. It is a traditional farmhouse from the 19th century and is of sound construction.

“Whatever the damage inside, I believe it can be repaired at a relatively small cost compared to the value of the house.”

He feels so passionately about retaining the farmhouse that Mr Drysdale has started a petition and has contacted Historic Scotland to try and prevent the building from being torn down.

But David Wardrop of Montgomery Forgan Associates, who is acting as an agent for the applicant, said that a structural survey had shown the cost of the work needed to restore the farmhouse would be substantially more than the value of the property.

He said: “It has reached the end of its natural lifetime and there is supporting evidence of this with the application.

Poor repair

“There is a sense of inevitability about it being demolished because it is in such poor repair. It needs a lot of work done including a new roof and new floors.

“No one wants to knock down a listed building but now and again it’s the only solution.”

He said the applicant is wanting to replace the existing building on a similar scale and with a similar appearance in context with the current design.