Jim’s story in film of miners’ strike

Members of the NUM miners' union picket line clash with police outside Bilston Glen colliery during the miners strike  in June 1984. Four policemen struggle with a picket.
Members of the NUM miners' union picket line clash with police outside Bilston Glen colliery during the miners strike in June 1984. Four policemen struggle with a picket.
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An ex-miner from Fife is to feature in a new documentary about the front line of the tumultuous 1984 miners strike.

Jim Tierney’s story will be included in ‘Still The Enemy Within’ which is due to be released next year to coincide with the 30th anniversary of the strike.

Jim worked in Fife until he was sacked in 1984 and was responsible for organising pickets across the whole of Scotland.

He remembers the men and women who joined him on strike with great admiration.

“They had bills to think about, they had Christmas to think about and they gave up everything for that year,” he explained. “It was just incredible.”

The strike began when the National Coal Board (NCB) announced plans to close up to 20 “uneconomic” pits.

It ended 35 weeks later, in November 1986 when the workers returned to the pits and the National Union of Miners (NUM) called off the strike.

Mining towns in Fife and across the UK lost many of their pits in the immediate aftermath of the strike with only a few small, privately-owned surface mines now remaining in Scotland.

‘Still the Enemy Within’ is a first time feature for director Owen Gower, telling the story of the strike through the voices of ‘Arthur’s Army’ - a group of miners who put themselves on the front-line of every major battle of the strike for a year.

It has already received high profile backing from director Ken Loach, journalist John Pilger and MPs Jeremy Corbyn and Dianne Abbott.

John Pilger, who reported from pit villages during the strike, said: “This is an important film. What happened to the miners in the 1980s is