Kirkcaldy man to await sentence on serious child pornography charges

The High Court in Edinburgh
The High Court in Edinburgh

A Kirkcaldy sex offender who was caught with horrifying child pornography after being released from prison has been told he could face a life sentence.

Jason Jordan defied a court order banning him from using a computer or mobile phone offering internet access which contained software allowing private browsing and deletion of its history.

Jordan (52) had uploaded indecent images of youngsters to the internet through an email account via a neighbour’s connection. The neighbour told police that Jordan had set up an internet connection for him and knew his password, after they turned up at his home with a warrant.

When police raided Jordan’s house they found he had a mobile phone and tablet with images and videos, some of the worst kind. The indecent material featured boys and girls aged between six months and 12-years-old.

Officers also found a copy of a Sexual Offences Prevention Order (SOPO) granted by a sheriff against Jordan on a table in the living room of his home in Caithness Place.

An examination of the devices revealed that 27 video files, 13 at the most serious level, would have been accessible to the user. A further 18 still images were recovered. Some of the material had been deleted.

A judge rejected a plea to impose a fixed sentence on Jordan and ruled that a full risk assessment order be made.

Lord Uist told Jordan at the High Court in Edinburgh today (Thursday) that the order would consider what risk his being at liberty posed to the public, and remanded him in Perth prison while the report is prepared.

Such orders can lead to the imposition of an Order for Lifelong Restriction where a court imposes a minimum jail term to be served but any future release is left to the parole authorities.

Jordan had previously admitted possessing indecent photographs of children and making such photos between February 1 and July 23 last year and breaching a SOPO granted on June 24 that year, when he appeared at Kirkcaldy Sheriff Court.

Kirkcaldy Sheriff Grant McCulloch sent the case to the High Court to be dealt with because of its greater powers of sentencing.

The sheriff was told that police received intelligence that indecent images of children had been uploaded to the internet through an account called JJordan.

Defence counsel Moira Mackenzie argued that making a risk assessment order was not necessary in the public interest. She said: “The last offence involving physical contact is now some years in the past.”

But she accepted that the latest offences Jordan had admitted were serious and included a breach of a court order and his licence conditions.

Lord Uist adjourned the case until May.