DCSIMG

Anstruther film festival’s gala night

Guests mingle before the award-ceremony at the inaugural Cannes-struther Film Festival at the Scottish Fisheries Museum. May 2014.

Guests mingle before the award-ceremony at the inaugural Cannes-struther Film Festival at the Scottish Fisheries Museum. May 2014.

It may not have attracted the same world media attention as its south of France counterpart but the inaugural Cannes-Struther Film Festival has been voted a big success.

Around guests attended the gala screenings and award-presentations at the Scottish Fisheries Museum on Saturday night.

Organised by the museum as part of the national Festival of Museums initiative, the ‘On the Edge’ title reflected the Year of Homecoming, the Commonwealth Games in Scotland and the museum’s ‘Distant Shores’ exhibition.

Professionals and amateurs were invited to submit short films on the theme of coastal life.

The overall winner was ‘Rig Life’, by professional filmmaker Ed Owles, which comprised four short films giving an insight into life aboard a North Sea oil rig.

The adult amateur winning entry was ‘The Wine Harvest’, by Yvonne Cook and Hamish Tough, which tracks the reactions of some Ferry-Port-on-Craig - now Tayport - people when the vessel ‘Vestal’ broke up in a storm in 1841 and delivered a cargo of wine to the local beaches on a Sunday.

Junior winner was ‘The Shipyard Worker’s Flat’, by pupils of Irvine Royal Academy, which takes viewers back in time to 1910 to glimpse into the lives of a family in a shipyard worker’s flat.

The late leading Scottish artist John Bellany, who was born and brought up in Port Seton, was the subject of the winning young amateur film, ‘John Bellany: A Childhood by the Sea’, by Preston Lodge High School students.

Professional winner was Paul Bates with his film ‘J.J. Prior: A voyage on the working Thames’.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page