DCSIMG

CAV a look at the officers in action

Police and councillors in Operation CAV in Levenmouth; Community Inspector Donald Jenks, Sgt Mike Collins and other officers, with (Labour) councillors Jim Young, David Graham and Charles Haffey.

Police and councillors in Operation CAV in Levenmouth; Community Inspector Donald Jenks, Sgt Mike Collins and other officers, with (Labour) councillors Jim Young, David Graham and Charles Haffey.

Police officers spread out across the streets of Levenmouth on Friday as part of a regular campaign to combat violent disorder.

Officers were taking part in the latest round of Operation CAV – Campaign Against Violence – which has two principal aims.

One is to tackle physically harmful crime before it happens, by talking first and making a reassuring approach.

The other is to show a high-visibility presence in communities, which signals a positive response and also increases officers on the beat.

The exercise came about last year after the formation of Police Scotland and involves officers up to the rank of superintendent.

It has been adapted all over Fife from the similar Operation Laser, in which parts of the Kingdom were patrolled with the help of officers and staff from other areas.

Friday’s team was accompanied by three Levenmouth councillors, Jim Young, Charles Haffey and David Graham.

Officers targeted well-known spots such as Leven’s Promenade and checked up on known offenders, including bail checks.

Some licensed premises were also visited to ensure alcohol was being sold responsibly.

As well as guarding against under-age sales, staff were encouraged, if they could, to keep an eye on what was going on outside the premises, such as adults arranging to buy alcohol for youngsters.

“Sometimes, shopkeepers are reluctant to report incidents in case we think they’ve failed in their licensing duties or are going to criticise them, but not so,” said Community Inspector Donald Jenks. “We are trying to work with them and they can call us if they need to.”

Another major thread of CAV is supporting victims of domestic violence.

Victims whose partners, or ex-partners, were known to be on bail would often be visited to reassure them against intimidation, and advised how they could improve their safety by knowing how to answer the door responsibly or acquiring a domestic abuse alarm.

Perpetrators whose bail terms included curfew were often checked to ensure they were in their homes when they should be.

Operation CAV usually happened on Fridays or Saturdays when the demand was greater, added Inspector Jenks.

It raised the number of police on foot patrols and included staff who normally worked in other departments from Monday to Friday.

Increasing the visible presence could prevent violence in the first place. Visiting premises and violent offenders before they did anything offered reassurance and prevention, while giving additional resources to the squad.

One of the more unusual incidents which came under police scrutiny during Operation CAV on Friday did not involve crime but still required officers to take action to ensure people were kept safe.

Around 8.00 p.m., at Bishops Court in Kennoway, a window sill collapsed and fell from a property, landing on the ground near the Co-op. Frost damage was suspected as the cause. Nobody was injured and Fife Council was called out to make repairs.

Later, arrests were made at an amateur football cup final after reports of incidents, including a player being injured by a bottle.

 

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