DCSIMG

First glimpse into Wemyss’ digital caves

Preparation work: Mike McFarlane (SWACS) chairman, Donald Evans and Neil McLaughlin worked in Jonathan's Cave last year to make sure it was presentable for the digital project

Preparation work: Mike McFarlane (SWACS) chairman, Donald Evans and Neil McLaughlin worked in Jonathan's Cave last year to make sure it was presentable for the digital project

 

The initial results of a project to digitally preserve the inside of Wemyss Caves are set to be presented at a special talk this month.

On Friday, January 31 the Save Wemyss Ancient Caves Society (SWACS) will host the event in the Senior Citizen’s Club at 79 Main Road in East Wemyss at 7.45 p.m.

SWACS will preview the initial findings of the recent digitilisation of Jonathan’s Cave.

The project aims to allow virtual visitors to explore the caves and their carvings online.

The venture has been commissioned through the joint partnership of SWACS, the Scottish Coastal Archaeology and Problems of Erosion (SCAPE) and York Archaeology Trust (YAT).

In November they carried out a specialist survey with the intention of creating an interpretative resource that will offer a high quality and realistic virtual way of exploring the caves.

Now specialists from the York Archaeological Trust (YAT) and St Andrews University will return to East Wemyss to give the local community insights into the initial results of their digital surveys of Jonathan’s Cave and its important Pictish carvings.

Time will also be given to the discussion of the memory recordings, old photographs and documents which were collected.

YAT is a highly respected archaeological organisation which holds accredited museum status and operates four visitor attractions in York including JORVIK - the world renowned Viking centre.

Mike McFarlane, chairman of SWACS, said the project will create an outstanding digital resource: “It is great to have YAT and archaeologists from St Andrews returning to East Wemyss to discuss and demonstrate their findings.

“These are crucial in expanding our understanding of the caves and will assist us in our long-term objective of saving them.

“It’s also a great opportunity for anyone interested in getting involved with SWACS to come along and meet the society.”

The initial contract was for a digital survey of one cave - Jonathan’s Cave - to be carried out over four days last November.

Events also included reminiscence sessions in the senior citizens hall where members of the local community could come together and share their memories of the caves throughout the decades.

If the pilot is a success and more funding can be secured, the plan is to extend the scheme to include all the Wemyss Caves.

The talk is free to attend and everyone is welcome.

 

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