DCSIMG

How Fife women broke the mould

Staff at WEA who are running a Fife wide heritage project about working women over the last 100 years - Susan Stevenson, admin officer, Nichola Dibley, volunteer, Kirstine Sloan, manager & Maureen Sangster, volunteer.

Staff at WEA who are running a Fife wide heritage project about working women over the last 100 years - Susan Stevenson, admin officer, Nichola Dibley, volunteer, Kirstine Sloan, manager & Maureen Sangster, volunteer.

 

Remembering Kirkcaldy’s striking bus conductresses

In January 1970, over 400 Kirkcaldy bus conductresses went on strike.

The strike would last 13 weeks, finally coming to an end on March 27.

In a story which bares many similarities to the Dagenham car factory workers, made famous by the film, ‘Made in Dagenham’, women in Kirkcaldy decided to make a stand in the campaign for equal pay.

Later that year, the enforcement of the Equal Pay Act justified their efforts and proved that women were a force to be reckoned with.

This was just one of many changes in working life for women in the last 100 years.

To celebrate these changes, the Workers Educational Association (WEA) are starting a major new two-year project, funded by the Heritage Lottery.

The ‘Breaking the Mould’ project will see research groups gather as much information as they can about the working life of women in Fife over the last 100 years before developing their findings into a drama production written by those involved.

The WEA want to know who were those people in Fife who campaigned and affected real change for women in work?

How did they do it and why? Maybe you’re one of them!

That’s where the people of Fife come in.

The research group will be meeting for six sessions every Thursday in the Old Kirk, Kirkcaldy beginning Thursday, April 24 at 10.00 a.m.

For more information, or if you would like to join the group, contact the WEA on (01383) 510 774 or e-mail Susan Stevenson at s.stevenson@weascotland.org.uk.

 

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