DCSIMG

Wemyss Caves project honoured

Picstured are: SWACS Education Liaison Officer, Sue Hamstead, Treasurer, Dave Anderson and Secretary, Pam Cranston, hold BAA award, with Tom Dawson and Dan Snow, left, and Marcus Abbott and Gavin MacGregor right.

Picstured are: SWACS Education Liaison Officer, Sue Hamstead, Treasurer, Dave Anderson and Secretary, Pam Cranston, hold BAA award, with Tom Dawson and Dan Snow, left, and Marcus Abbott and Gavin MacGregor right.

The Save Wemyss Ancient Caves Society (SWACS) has been highly commended at the British Archaeological Awards.

The Society was awarded a certificate of excellence at the awards for the creation of its Wemyss Caves 4D interactive website.

The digital project gives visitors virtual access to one of the historic caves, which houses an array of Pictish markings and allows viewers to interact with them.

The project is the result of a collaborative visualisation scheme involving SWACS in partnership with York Archaeological Trust (YAT); Scottish Coastal Archaeology and the Problem of Erosion (SCAPE) with valuable input from the community.

The ceremony was held at the British Museum, presided over by Deborah Williams, chairman of the British Archaeological Awards and compered by Loyd Grossman, chairman of the Heritage Alliance.

Of the hundreds of entries only 18 made the short-list, with three projects nominated for each of the six categories.

Wemyss Caves 4D had been short-listed in the ‘Best Public Presentation of Archaeology’ along with Channel 4’s ‘New Secrets of the Terracotta Army’ and the University of York’s archaeological journal, ‘Post Hole.’

‘New Secrets of the Terraccotta Army’ was the overall winner, with ‘Wemyss 4D’ and ‘Post Hole’ both highly commended.

Dr Tom Dawson of the University of St Andrews and SCAPE said: “The project with SWACS was very rewarding.

“Not only did we manage to capture fantastic 3D images of Jonathan’s Cave and its carvings, but were able to scan some fantastic images showing how rapidly the coast had eroded around East Wemyss, together with some fascinating oral history.

“Some of this is already included on the 4Dwemysscaves website.”

Dr Sue Hamstead, education officer of SWACS, said: “We’re learning so much from this project and we’re keen to continue working with our partners from YAT and SCAPE to sustain this innovative trend and bring the best techniques available to the recording of the rest of the caves.” Pam Cranston, secretary of SWACS, added: “It was quite an experience seeing our project profiled in this way. The support we continue to receive is crucial to the cause of preserving and undersanding these unique caves.”

 

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