Morgan’s walk triumph

Morgan Wishart (centre) who is 15 and from Windygates. She completed the Kidney Research UK Walk the Bridges walk in Glasgow just 10 weeks after a kidney transplant. Pictured with mum Lynn and sister Holly. They raised �2000.
Morgan Wishart (centre) who is 15 and from Windygates. She completed the Kidney Research UK Walk the Bridges walk in Glasgow just 10 weeks after a kidney transplant. Pictured with mum Lynn and sister Holly. They raised �2000.

A teenager from Windygates, who underwent a life-saving operation just three months ago, has helped to raise thousands of pounds for charity at a walk in Glasgow.

Fifteen-year-old Morgan Wishart took part in Kidney Research UK’s Glasgow Bridges Walk – a seven-mile walk to raise funds for research into kidney disease earlier this month.

But just 10 weeks before taking on the challenge, she’d received a life-saving kidney transplant from her dad, Scott.

Mum Lynn said: “On the morning of the walk, Morgan didn’t think she would manage it but she did – it was the most amazing feeling for me. It was a huge achievement just 10 weeks after her transplant.

“She has been doing so well since her transplant and enjoying being able to be just like her friends. She’ll always have to go to the clinic, take her medication and make sure she is drinking plenty – she needs to keep Dynamo the big juicy kidney, as Morgan calls him, as healthy as possible. But no dialysis makes a huge difference to her young life.”

Morgan first took part in the walk in 2013, where she crossed the finish line first. Just three months before her victory, she’d been diagnosed with end stage kidney failure.

She said: “I didn’t cross the finish line first this year but I’m still so proud that I finished the walk. A group of us did the walk together and we raised £2000 for Kidney Research UK.”

Every year, over 55,000 people in the UK are being treated for end stage kidney failure and, currently, there is no cure available for people with kidney disease. It can affect anyone at any age and, if detected early, there is a better outcome for the patient.

Before her transplant, Morgan was hooked up to a dialysis machine every night and was unable to enjoy some of her favourite foods, like crisps and chocolate.

But now, she can eat what she likes and have sleepovers with her friends.

Linda Rogers, events manager for Kidney Research UK, said: “This year, almost 500 people took part in our Glasgow Bridges Walk, which is fantastic! We couldn’t have asked for better weather, and it was great to see everyone in purple and supporting the cause. The money raised by everyone who took part will help fund vital research into kidney disease, which doesn’t have a cure.”