Mum’s tears of joy as doctor gives Reece syringe all-clear

Mum, Emily Henderson and seven-year-old Reece after the 'all-clear'
Mum, Emily Henderson and seven-year-old Reece after the 'all-clear'

THE anguish and trauma following a youngster’s injury from a discarded drug needle in a children’s playground is finally over, reports NEIL HENDERSON.

And now after six months of continuous hospital checks and constant worry concerning the youngsters long-term health, the family have been given the good news that he had not been infected by the discarded syringe.

1612006 SSGG reece henderson 'Reece Henderson - recently given the all-clear after injuring himself on a discarded needle - at home in Alves Drive, Glenrothes

1612006 SSGG reece henderson 'Reece Henderson - recently given the all-clear after injuring himself on a discarded needle - at home in Alves Drive, Glenrothes

Back in August last year, Reese Henderson then six years old and his two brothers were innocently playing close to their home in Tanshall when they stumbled across 20 discarded syringes and other drug users paraphernalia.

Doctors at Victoria Hospital, Kirkcaldy gave mum, Emily the ‘all-clear’ confirmation that she had agonised over last week.

“It was the shortest conversation of my life, but also one of the most pleasing,” she told the Gazette.

“They simply announced the results of the Reece’s final blood test as being all-clear and I burst into tears, I couldn’t speak I was so relieved.

“It’s been the worst six months my family’s life, the worry and the little niggles were always there in the back of my head, constantly fretting over whether or not everything was going to turn out alright.

“I didn’t take Reece with me to the hospital last week, just in case it was bad news, and anyway, he’s been there more than he deserves.

“When I came home I was very tearful but Reece just asked ‘if the germs had gone’ and when I said they had, he just asked if he could go out and play.”

There was public anger in the wake of the incident as residents, many with young children, demanded immediate action to rid the area of the needle dumping problem.

Community police Officers and community Wardens stepped up patrols in the area and Fife Council’s environmental services department increased road sweeping following the complaints.

Emily was quick to praise the staff at Tanshall Primary School, who she said had been ‘fantastic’ in the way the dealt with the issues surrounding Reece’s injury threat.

“We never mentioned it as a family as we didn’t want to put any extra pressure on him, but at the same time we had to make sure other people were aware of the situation.

“After all, he’s just a typical young lad, climbing trees and coming home with grazed knees, pretty normal stuff, but all that still needs to be handled correctly, especially given the circumstances.”

The family are now just relieved to be able to put the nightmare behind them while Reece, who turned seven in February, is keen to be outside playing with his two brothers.

“I’m just glad we don’t have this worry hanging over us any longer” said a relieved Emily, “It’s been a nightmare ordeal but I hope the area has been made that little bit safer and we can now move on.”

neil.henderson@fifetoday.co.uk

01592 753205