New Glenrothes bio-refinery plant is the root to future success

Annabelle Ewing MSP and Fife Provost Jim Leishman visit CelluComp's new bio-refinery plant in Glenrothes.
Annabelle Ewing MSP and Fife Provost Jim Leishman visit CelluComp's new bio-refinery plant in Glenrothes.

A new bio-refinery plant, the first of its kind in Scotland, producing sustainable materials made from waste root vegetables, has opened in Glenrothes.

CelluComp, based in South Field area of the town, has created the ground-breaking new product, Curran, which is used for a variety of applications from paints and paper to packaging,

There is huge potential in Scotland for the development and successful application of industrial biotechnology

Annabelle Ewing MSP

And with Scotland’s bio-refinery sector worth £189 million in 2013, the company’s decision to base its first European plant in Glenrothes could soon see the town as a centre for the emerging bio-refinery market.

The plant was officially opened by Annabelle Ewing MSP, Minister for Youth and Women’s Employment, who welcomed the decision to use Fife as its base.

“There is huge potential in Scotland for the development and successful application of industrial biotechnology and to create future high value roles,” she told the Gazette.

“Ambitious and innovative companies like CelluComp have already proven the important role they play in this development. “

Opened with the support from Scottish Enterprise, and the ScotGrad scheme, it has provided a jobs boost to the region.