SPEAKING PERSONALLY: Scott Inglis

Scott Inglis
Scott Inglis

I don’t consider myself to be much of a political animal.

Considering I work as a journalist on a local newspaper, a certain degree of political interest is important, obviously, but I’ve never been one to get involved in any kind of debate with the politically minded outwith the office.

This is mainly because my grasp of anything other than the basic workings of council and parliamentary topics is slight at best, and I’d be shown up quite easily as the bumbling, ineloquent, scantly educated, charlatan that I really am.

Despite this, one politician I’ve always taken more than just a passing interest in is the now George Galloway MP.

I’m probably not alone in this, Galloway has, for some years, been more than simply a politician in the same way your Millibands, Cleggs or Camerons are.

He’s a celebrity, an orator and a public figure.

And I see nothing wrong with that.

I find it hard to disagree with anything that comes out of the Dundonian’s mouth.

His opposition to involvement in now on-going wars, which the masses appreciate were folly, was as vocal and as heavy as anybody’s.

His stance against racism, his pro-trade union support and backing for the working classes and the poor resonates with me.

I struggle to comprehend how anybody could differ.

In fact, only his support for Glasgow Celtic Football Club is where I can find a (quite considerable) difference of opinion.

It was a genuine, and pleasant, surprise to wake up the morning after his recent Bradford West Parliamentary win and flick on the TV channels to see him there in all his pomp, cigar wedged between teeth, a V for victory salute raised and sunglasses on – not unlike a modern day Winston Churchill.

Politics needs people like Galloway.

In the hours following his election he, predictably, was criticised for ‘choosing’ to stand in a constituency with a high Asian population.

He was accused of being a chancer, his Respect party cashing in on Galloway’s high standing among that demographic.

Of course, the irony of that particular piece of finger pointing, that a Catholic Scot was in someway more appealing than the Labour Muslim candidate, was lost on them.

His subsequent return, taking over 50 per cent of the vote, showed those accusations up as being insulting and misinformed, not just to Galloway, but to the people of Bradford West.

The campaign he ran on opposition to war and cuts connected with people, a trait Galloway is a master at given the faith people have placed in him in vastly differing constituencies on both sides of the borders.

Furthermore, it must also have hammered home to the main parties that their seats can no longer be taken for granted.

It’s a delight to see the man return to Parliament, for George Galloway is a working class hero.

And that’s certainly something to be.

Scott Inglis writes in the East Fife Mail. I don’t consider myself to be much of a political animal.

Considering I work as a journalist on a local newspaper, a certain degree of political interest is important, obviously, but I’ve never been one to get involved in any kind of debate with the politically minded outwith the office.

This is mainly because my grasp of anything other than the basic workings of council and parliamentary topics is slight at best, and I’d be shown up quite easily as the bumbling, ineloquent, scantly educated, charlatan that I really am.

Despite this, one politician I’ve always taken more than just a passing interest in is the now George Galloway MP.

I’m probably not alone in this, Galloway has, for some years, been more than simply a politician in the same way your Millibands, Cleggs or Camerons are.

He’s a celebrity, an orator and a public figure.

And I see nothing wrong with that.

I find it hard to disagree with anything that comes out of the Dundonian’s mouth.

His opposition to involvement in now on-going wars, which the masses appreciate were folly, was as vocal and as heavy as anybody’s.

His stance against racism, his pro-trade union support and backing for the working classes and the poor resonates with me.

I struggle to comprehend how anybody could differ.

In fact, only his support for Glasgow Celtic Football Club is where I can find a (quite considerable) difference of opinion.

It was a genuine, and pleasant, surprise to wake up the morning after his recent Bradford West Parliamentary win and flick on the TV channels to see him there in all his pomp, cigar wedged between teeth, a V for victory salute raised and sunglasses on – not unlike a modern day Winston Churchill.

Politics needs people like Galloway.

In the hours following his election he, predictably, was criticised for ‘choosing’ to stand in a constituency with a high Asian population.

He was accused of being a chancer, his Respect party cashing in on Galloway’s high standing among that demographic.

Of course, the irony of that particular piece of finger pointing, that a Catholic Scot was in someway more appealing than the Labour Muslim candidate, was lost on them.

His subsequent return, taking over 50 per cent of the vote, showed those accusations up as being insulting and misinformed, not just to Galloway, but to the people of Bradford West.

The campaign he ran on opposition to war and cuts connected with people, a trait Galloway is a master at given the faith people have placed in him in vastly differing constituencies on both sides of the borders.

Furthermore, it must also have hammered home to the main parties that their seats can no longer be taken for granted.

It’s a delight to see the man return to Parliament, for George Galloway is a working class hero.

And that’s certainly something to be.

Scott Inglis writes in the East Fife Mail.