Police tribute for Wemyss’ sea mine tragedy

Cheque: CI Kinmond (left) with Brian Steer and Eddie Devlin accepting the cheque from Ms Hitchcock.

Cheque: CI Kinmond (left) with Brian Steer and Eddie Devlin accepting the cheque from Ms Hitchcock.

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A RELATIVE of one of the brave men who died while trying to prevent a sea mine drifting towards West Wemyss has presented a cheque to the local police force.

Esther Hitchcock’s great-uncle, George Storrar, was one of the five heroic men who on January 23, 1941, during World War Two, tried to negotiate the mine away from the village to prevent a catastrophe.

Mr Storrar had enlisted as a special constable with Fife police and was alerted that an object was floating near the Lady’s Rock.

He immediately went to the scene and tried to stop it moving towards the village, aware of the danger it posed.

Tragically the mine detonated, killing all five, but their efforts have never been forgotten, and earlier this year a permanent tribute was set up in the village near to the church where they are all buried.

The memorial was created through the efforts of the West Wemyss Memorial Group, of which Esther is a member, who also commissioned an image of a mine through the Kirremuir artist, Bruce Walker.

Esther recently presented a cheque on behalf of the group for £250 to the retired police officers fund, while the commissioned picture of the memorial was also handed over to Chief Inspector Graeme Kinmond

Only twenty prints were made and Esther has chosen to give one of those to Levenmouth Police Station.