Call for Fife Council to support miners strike inquiry

Calls for Fife Council to support demands for an inquiry into policing of the 1984 miners's strike in Scotland.

Calls for Fife Council to support demands for an inquiry into policing of the 1984 miners's strike in Scotland.

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Calls are being made for Fife Council to back demands for a public inquiry into policing in Scotland during the 1984/85 miners’ strike.

Former miner Tom Adams, councillor for Leven, Kennoway and Largo, is urging his Fife authority colleagues to back demand for the Scottish Government to launch an inquiry.

In a motion to be submitted to full council on Thursday, and seconded by fellow Labour councillor for West Fife and Coastal Villages, Bobby Clelland, also a miner at the time of the strike, Mr Adams states: “This is an opportunity for the Scottish Government to allow the miners in Fife and across Scotland who were wrongfully arrested and convicted to get the justice they believe they deserve and to strengthen the Orgreave Campaigners in their continued fight for justice.”

Mr Adam’s call come just weeks after new Home Secretary Amber Rudd ruled out an inquiry into the the so-called battle of Orgreave, which took place during the 1984 miners’ strike.

Mr Adams adds: “Fife Council realises that, as a first step, endeavours should be made for an application to the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission, however, notes that to date, no applications have been made.”

Mr Adams told the East Fife Mail he is confident of getting the support for the motion but expects some resistance from Conservative councillors.

“ There is an absolute necessity for this inquiry, many people were wrongly arrested, given criminal records and some have since passed away without their names be cleared,” he added.

“People don’t always realise, that unlike in England where the courts ruled it an illegal strike, in Scotland it was legal, yet hundreds were arrested at places like Ravenscraig and Hunterston.

“There’s a real push, helped by the 30-year rule that is allowing new evidence to be realised for the first time that strengthens our call for an inquiry.”