Fife edges closer to SNP / Labour agreement as talks continue

Fife Council Headquarters in Glenrothes.
Fife Council Headquarters in Glenrothes.

Fife is edging closer to an SNP / Labour agreement on how the new Council administration will be run.

Fife SNP deputy leader counillor Karen Marjoram has said today that “progress” has been made with their Labour counterparts as discussions continue ahead of next week’s first council meeting since last week’s election result.

“As the largest party in Fife, the SNP has been in talks with Labour and other parties all this week,” said Cllr Marjoram.

“We have been making progress with the Labour Group in seeing where we have similar aims, and whether there is a way we can work together for the benefit of the people of Fife.

“These talks will continue into next week, and we hope to have a way forward agreed in time for the first meeting of Fife Council on the May 18.”

With no single political party securing an outright majority in last Thursday’s council election, there has been much speculation and discussion among the various political factions throughout this week as an a greement is sought.

Fife Labour leader David Ross is expected to continue lead talks on behalf of his party throughout the weekend but said no form of coalition will be entered into with the SNP group, or others, until options have been put before the fife Labour group of councillors when they meet on Monday evening.

“We have ruled out working with the Conservative group and whether an agreement can be reached with the Nationalists or others remains to be seen,” said Cllr Ross.

“We will be doing all we can to protect the fundamental principles within our manifesto particularly jobs and public services in Fife.”

Meanwhile Fife Conservative leader Dave Dempsey has called on all parties to run Fife Council as a way of ending division in the Kingdom.

He said: “The public tell us that they’d like us to put aside party squabbling and work together to make a better Fife. Well, now we have the perfect opportunity. The voters have made it impossible for one party to run the Council and political considerations make it very unlikely that any two can join forces against the others.

“So why don’t we put aside the negative ideas of administration and opposition and all work together?

“The senior positions can be shared on the basis of the number of councillors each party has and those councillors can then pick the best bits from each of the manifestos to take forward.”