pupils dig deep to preserve town’s history

Pupils from Torbain Primary burying a timecapsule at sainsburys store in Kdy;'(standing; DAVID MCDONALD & COLIN RICHARDS from Barr Construction with SAM GROGAN from Sainsburys, with P7 pupils CRAIG KELLY, CHLOE MCGLASHAN, JODIE MOFFAT, LUKE FLEMING & REISS GORDON'photo; WALTER NEILSON
Pupils from Torbain Primary burying a timecapsule at sainsburys store in Kdy;'(standing; DAVID MCDONALD & COLIN RICHARDS from Barr Construction with SAM GROGAN from Sainsburys, with P7 pupils CRAIG KELLY, CHLOE MCGLASHAN, JODIE MOFFAT, LUKE FLEMING & REISS GORDON'photo; WALTER NEILSON

Youngsters from Torbain Primary are preserving the history of Kirkcaldy for future generations by burying a time capsule as part of a supermarket extension project.

With the new extension of the town’s Sainsbury’s store in Chapel Park, due to open next week, the school’s class 7B packed a time capsule with facts and memories capturing their own experiences of Kirkcaldy.

Then the site team from Barr Construction which is carrying out the building work, provided the tools and expertise to help the pupils bury their future treasure.

Colin Richards, project manager at Barr Construction, said: “As builders, we know how much the world is constantly changing and it’s great to see youngsters taking an interest in the history of their area as well as its future.

“Once we learned about the project, we realised the redevelopment of the store would offer the perfect opportunity to bury this valuable historical record on the site.”

Researching

The Torbain youngsters spent hours researching Kirkcaldy’s past and present as part of their project which spanned the last century.

Some pupils chose to make collages and maps of everyday life and the local area, while others designed posters to illustrate technology in their school in 2012.

The time capsule was placed in a specially created mini underground vault at the front of the store.

Teachers and pupils anticipate the capsule will lie undisturbed until the 22nd century at the earliest.

Sharon Thibert, 7B teacher, said: “The children gained a great deal from the project, not only by learning about the rich history of their area but also by gaining an appreciation of how people in the future might regard how we live our lives today.

“Producing the time capsule gave the senior pupils the freedom to express themselves creatively as well as the confidence to lead a project independently instead of being instructed by staff.”