Scotland’s treasure trove

Treasure Trove annual report -  15th century Gold Finger Ring, Loch Leven, Perth & Kinross(TT.92/14)'A substantial gold finger ring with the bezel set for a stone, although this is now missing. The exterior of the hoop is engraved with the inscription 'mat m memeto mei', a contraction or variation on the common 'mater dei, memento mei', or 'Mother of God, remember me'. The ring is undoubtedly a high quality piece that would represent a challenge to the medieval goldsmith and in both complexity and form this is an unusual survival in a Scottish context. Allocated to National Museums Scotland.

Treasure Trove annual report - 15th century Gold Finger Ring, Loch Leven, Perth & Kinross(TT.92/14)'A substantial gold finger ring with the bezel set for a stone, although this is now missing. The exterior of the hoop is engraved with the inscription 'mat m memeto mei', a contraction or variation on the common 'mater dei, memento mei', or 'Mother of God, remember me'. The ring is undoubtedly a high quality piece that would represent a challenge to the medieval goldsmith and in both complexity and form this is an unusual survival in a Scottish context. Allocated to National Museums Scotland.

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Last year was a bumper year for treasure hunters in Scotland

Amongst the finds recorded in The Queen’s and Lord Treasurer’s Remembrancer’s annual Treasure Trove Report are jewellery, a toy and an altar stone.

Treasure trove annual report - 17th Century Finger Ring, Inverbervie, Aberdeenshire (TT.47/14)'Although superficially similar to modern wedding rings, 17th century rings contained a romantic inscription (or poesy). In this case the inscription reads The God above incress our love. The majority of inscriptions can be found in a variety of books aimed at a male audience, such as the popular Cupid's Posies which contained both useful advice on wooing and an appendix if suitable poesies for the wedding ring itself. Allocated to Aberdeenshire Heritage

Treasure trove annual report - 17th Century Finger Ring, Inverbervie, Aberdeenshire (TT.47/14)'Although superficially similar to modern wedding rings, 17th century rings contained a romantic inscription (or poesy). In this case the inscription reads The God above incress our love. The majority of inscriptions can be found in a variety of books aimed at a male audience, such as the popular Cupid's Posies which contained both useful advice on wooing and an appendix if suitable poesies for the wedding ring itself. Allocated to Aberdeenshire Heritage

The Queen’s and Lord Treasurer’s Remembrancer is the Crown office-holder responsible for claiming objects for the Crown under the law of Treasure Trove and bona vacantia.

In the last year, 284 objects found by members of the public were allocated to museums across Scotland as 94 separate Treasure Trove cases.

Finders of objects are routinely given an ex gratia payment to recognise their contribution and last year that amounted to £67,580, with individual payments ranging from £20 to £20,000.

Catherine Dyer, the Queen’s and Lord Treasurer’s Remembrancer described the last year as “magnificent” for Treasure Trove, a year that resulted in: “some outstanding finds being displayed in breathtaking museum collections around Scotland.”

In Inverbervie a 17th century ring, similar to a modern wedding ring, was found, containing a romantic inscription reading: “The God above incress our love.”

Further south, another gold ring was uncovered at Loch Leven. The high quality piece, that would have been a challenging for medieval goldsmiths to make, has been allocated to National Museums Scotland.

An unusual type of Roman brooch, consisting of a flat circular design with a central boss of black glass, was discovered at Carnwath. The front of the brooch has been decorated with a sunburst design in red enamel.

Rather more prosaically, Cupar in Fife, was where a 16th century silver nail cleaner was found. The cleaner has been engraved with the motto ‘PRENES+EN+GRE’ an abbreviated form of the phrase ‘accept with gratitude the gift of him who loves you’ a form of words commonly associated with objects given as a romantic gift.