Objections to housing plan

Plans for a major housing development in Windygates have attracted scores of objections from people living in the village.

By Kevin McRoberts
Thursday, 4th August 2022, 9:45 am

Campion Homes has applied to Fife Council to build 80 new homes on land to the north of Cameron Crescent at Temple, Balcurvie.

However, more than 100 objections have been registered with the local authority’s planning service, with only a handful of submissions expressing support for the development.

One of the the objectors, a resident who has lived in Windygates all her life and is the fourth generation of her family to be brought up there, said: “This village has fought for over 30 years to stop development on this site and won, but now the goalposts have been moved.

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“Originally the developer was told that they needed two vehicle access points and this couldn’t be done, so now the council is saying one will do.

“The streets in the middle of the village are not built for this kind of traffic.

“The lorries taking material to the site will have to use these streets too.”

She also claimed the infrastructure of the village would not be able to cope with so many new houses.

“The drainage system and sewage system can’t cope as it is, and all these houses will make matters worse,” she said.

Other objectors have highlighted previous planning applications for development of the site being refused – and rejected again on appeal – and insist the land should not be zoned for housing.

One commented: “The people of the surrounding Temple area have objected to houses being built on this land for the last 30 years. Why has this harassment continued?

Residents of this village have been to court and won a legal decision not to have houses built on this land. Who can overrule the court's decisions? Who can overrule the Secretary of State?

“If this land is put up for housing, who will compensate all the thousands who contributed to the legal battle and won the case?”

Further concerns relate to environmental issues, with claims the land is home to a variety of wildlife, including deer, foxes, rabbits and bats.

Issues over disruption during the construction of the houses, traffic congestion on already busy roads in the village, and pressures on schools and health services have also been raised.

One resident said: “The surrounding village GPs and dental practices are not taking on their list any new patients. Eighty more homes would add pressure to NHS services, which are already under great strain. What plans are proposed?”

Campion Homes held online and in-person consultation events prior to submitting its planning application which it had hoped would address concerns that might arise.

Its report following the consultations states: “Whilst a number of people who have got involved with the engagement event have apprehensions about the proposals, there was also a significant number of people who have registered an interest because they support the development.”

And in its planning report supporting the application, Campion expresses the view that the delivery of 80 modern and high-quality homes on the site will make a significant contribution to meeting housing needs in general across Fife.

And it concludes: “Development of the site need not generate adverse impacts on existing services and infrastructure and will not adversely affect the amenity of existing or future residents.”

It will now be up to councillors to decide in due course whether or not to approve the development.