Planning permission granted for houses on former Fife paper mill site

Kingdom Housing Association has been granted planning permission to build 85 affordable homes on the site of the former Tullis Russell paper mill in Glenrothes.
An aerial plan of the housing and mixed use development on the former Tullis Russell site in Glenrothes that is set to be come a reailty ovre the next decade. Credit Barton WillmoreAn aerial plan of the housing and mixed use development on the former Tullis Russell site in Glenrothes that is set to be come a reailty ovre the next decade. Credit Barton Willmore
An aerial plan of the housing and mixed use development on the former Tullis Russell site in Glenrothes that is set to be come a reailty ovre the next decade. Credit Barton Willmore

Last year Fife Council gave the green light for a major redevelopment to go ahead over the next 10 years which will eventually include 850 homes, a care home and a retail and leisure zone.

This first development, located north of Queensway, will meet the development plan requirement for 10 per cent of the site’s capacity to be affordable homes.

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Taking up four hectares of the 55.5 heactares site, the development will be made up of two-storey and bungalow homes, with a mixture of two, three, four and five-bedroomed properties.

Planning permission was granted via a delegated decision by council officers meaning it didn’t have to go to councillors.

In his report case officer Chris Smith said: “In assessing this proposal Fife Council Housing and Neighbourhood Services have advised that there is an identified five-year need for 390 affordable units in the Glenrothes Local Housing Strategy Area.

“The principle of the proposal is considered acceptable as it relates to the proposed redevelopment of a predominantly vacant brownfield site which has the benefit of planning permission in principle for affordable housing.

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“The proposal is also considered acceptable in that it would meet the relevant requirements for affordable housing by providing the minimum requirement of 10 per cent of the total number of units on the wider site.”

North Glenrothes Community Council voiced concerns that the wider development could eventually become a “rat run” for access to Cadham Road.

Mr Smith said: “Although the proposal would result in an increase in vehicle movements across the local road network, these changes are not significant enough to merit a refusal nor are any transport interventions required at this early stage of the wider redevelopment.”

He did like an idea that electricity/heat could be supplied by the nearby RWE plant.

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Mr Smith said: “This is a very valid point and has been extensively assessed and should the necessary funding be secured then the infrastructure to support it should be installed.”

RWE for their part were worried about future noise complaints from new residents, but are investing in further noise abatement.