Lloyd George’s legacy is donation to help patients at hospital

From left, Bryanne George, Charge Nurse Moira Dinvernos Snr, Colin George, Tegan George, Service Manager Gemma Couser and  Joan George. Picture: George McLuskie
From left, Bryanne George, Charge Nurse Moira Dinvernos Snr, Colin George, Tegan George, Service Manager Gemma Couser and Joan George. Picture: George McLuskie

The family of a community fundraiser, whose dying quest was to buy vital equipment for the Victoria Hospital, have raised so much cash they’ve been able to buy two patient devices instead of one.

Lloyd George underwent a short stint in hospital last year, during which he noticed the ward only had one ‘cricket’ patient transport aid.

Lloyd George

Lloyd George

Always one to make a difference, Lloyd began raising funds.

However he passed away shortly after, but not before hearing that an online campaign had reached its target and then some!

Now Lloyd’s family this week officially handed over the two devices to Victoria Hospital’s Ward 42.

His son Colin said Lloyd was always heavily involved in the community.

He said: “The money he raised, through charity football matches and quizes was just phenomenal.

“When he ended up in Victoria Hospital, he saw that there was an issue - there was only one of these patient transporters for something like 40-plus beds.

“He felt heart-broken, so as soon as he got out he said ‘Right, we’re raising money for these crickets.

“He just wanted everyone to get the opportunity to get the best life they could.

“My dad came from poverty and nothing was ever handed to him on a plate, so he’s always been quite driven.

“He was one of these characters who just spoke to folk and they spoke back to him, he was quite magnetic with his personality.”

“He took a stroke when he was 59. He had prostate cancer, and non-alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver. He just got more and more ill, not that you’d ever know that if you met him, he just mucked about and distracted everyone to stop them feeling sorry for him.”

Accepting the two new crickets, Senior Charge Nurse, Moira Dinverno, said: “These two crickets will be getting put to very good use supporting stroke patients with mobility issues in getting around, mainly from their beds to nearby chairs or bathrooms.”