New marina gives Burntisland a boost

Aerial shot of the new pontoons and Burntisland Sailing Club's boat yard. Pic courtesy of Bruce Meldrum
Aerial shot of the new pontoons and Burntisland Sailing Club's boat yard. Pic courtesy of Bruce Meldrum

Burntisland Sailing Club craned more yachts into the water last weekend than at any other time during its 60 year history.

Membership has burgeoned since the club’s marina development plans, including the installation of new pontoons and an access ramp, were announced last year.

The inner dock before pontoons were installed

The inner dock before pontoons were installed

And now the organisation, which started off with just a handful of members in a shed at the Lammerlaws over 60 years ago, has over 90 members.

The installation of the new pontoons which took place throughout the week is the first step in the ambitious project which as well as encouraging more people to try sailing, hopes to attract more visitors from around the UK and overseas.

“More boats, means more members, which means more revenue for our club and the town,” explained commodore, Sarah Price.

“That’s great for offsetting our development costs, but, with more boats to lift, it can make for a long day at the start of the sailing season.

The newly installed pontoons will provide berthing for Burntisland Sailing Club members and visitors

The newly installed pontoons will provide berthing for Burntisland Sailing Club members and visitors

“But we’re not complaining because we’re a community organisation with an aim on affordability, not on profit. If the publicity causes more people to enjoy sailing, then we’re very happy with that result.”

All the club’s pontoon installation plans clicked together, with barely a moment to spare before the big boat lift-in began for the start of the new sailing season.

Over the last six months the club has doubled the size of its boatyard in the east dock, which is now home to around 40 boats of all sizes.

“Though costs for the new marina were kept to a minimum by club members sharing the workload between themselves where possible, inevitably a contractor was needed to install specialised equipment. Gael Force Marine was still working on site only 12 hours before the big day,” added Sarah.

Boats from Burntisland Sailing Club being lowered by crane into the harbour

Boats from Burntisland Sailing Club being lowered by crane into the harbour

Now a colourful line of yachts occupies the previously bare west wall of Burntisland’s inner dock, their halyards and burgees fluttering in the breeze.

“Burntisland harbour is already internationally important for marine engineering and, with the completion of our marina project, that’s an important corner of this great space which is retained for the leisure and enjoyment of local people.”

The boats safely installed at the new pontoons

The boats safely installed at the new pontoons

Sarah Price, commodore

Sarah Price, commodore

Members of the sailing club

Members of the sailing club