Fife inventor set to appear on international TV show

A Kirkcaldy inventor is to appear on an international TV show in order to show off his invention.

Friday, 13th December 2019, 11:05 am
Updated Friday, 13th December 2019, 11:08 am
Brian McCormack
Brian McCormack

Brian McCormack has created a range of soluble products which he hopes will help solve the world’s environmental problems.

The taxi driver, and former miner, has invented wet wipes capable of cleaning up mess and then dissolving in water.

He has been invited to show off his new dissolving wet wipes on El Hormiguero, one of the biggest TV shows in Spain and South America, which broadcasts daily.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

The comedy and science show features experiments, stunts, and celebrity guests such as Will Smith, Margot Robbie, Hugh Jackman and Hugh Laurie.

Normal wet wipes aren’t biodegradable, and are made of plastic fibre which is often wrongly flushed down the toilet.

They can present a danger to wildlife or become stuck as part of ‘fatbergs’ which clog up sewer networks.

Brian said it was a huge honour to be invited to appear on the show.

He added: “It’s great to be invited to appear on an international TV show.

“It’s really exciting.”It’ll be live so there’ll be no room for mistakes.

“It’s not every day a Kirkcaldy guy gets asked to be in international TV - especially when it’s the taxi driver that just picked you up last Friday night.

“I’ll give them a demonstration of the soluble wet wipes by cleaning something up then dissolving it in water.

“I’m looking forward to seeing who else they have on as there are a lot of big names appear on El Hormiguero.”
Brian added that he’s keen to show off the environmental potential of the soluble wet wipes

“Normal wet wipes make up 80 per cent of fatbergs. They bind everything together and it ends up like cement.

“Mine just disolve in water no problem.”

Brian has also made soluble bandages which he hopes can help burns victims, and recently began working with the Strathclyde Aerospace Centre of Excellence.

They are looking to use his technology for space travel, where packaging could be disolved after use.