Fife prepares for ‘worst case’ no deal Brexit

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Services across Fife are preparing for the “worst case” no deal Brexit.

At the Fife partnership board, heads of services including fire and rescue, police and NHS, gave updates on plans for the UK’s departure from the EU.

The clock is ticking to D-DAy when the UK leaves on March 29 – and there is concern, no-one knows what may happen.

Steve Grimmond, Fife Council chief executive, told the board: “I am concious that there is significant activity to prepare for a reasonable worst case scenario.

“Work is underway on a national level, and at a Fife level we are actively engaging in partnerships for a no deal scenario. Local partnerships are meeting on the 19th to look at all the arrangements to consider.

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“At Fife Council, we are working to establish an incident management team for facing any crises.”

It is estimated there are around 30 per cent of businesses in Fife which rely heavily on import and exports to Europe.

Added Mr Chisholm: “We don’t have all the answers yet, and it may not still come to pass, but we need to be prepared for it.”

Tricia Marwick, who chairs NHS Fife Board, said: “We are working closely with the Scottish Government, and relying on intelligence nationally about access to drugs and services, and more information will be fed in when we’re in a position to share more accurately.”

The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service echoed this sentiment, saying it was difficult to make plans when a deal had not yet been agreed.

Roddie Keith, senior fire officer, said: “The majority of this planning is done at a national level. We have some involvement in event plans around March 29, with extra staff a few days either side.

“Our key issues is to ensure the supply chain remains robust. We’re seeing assurances as things like breathing apparatus is supplied from Germany and fire engine and replacement parts come from Sweden.

“The problem is that we don’t know exactly what issues it is we’re going to face yet.”