Care inspection: ‘Clear strengths’ in Fife's support for adult protection measures

An inspection into adult support and protection measures in Fife has found areas for improvemrnt - but also pinpointed the service’s “clear strengths.”

By Allan Crow
Wednesday, 11th August 2021, 3:02 pm
The report found clear strengths supporting adults at risk of harm
The report found clear strengths supporting adults at risk of harm

The joint inspection was carried out in the Kingdom between May and August.

It involved inspectors from the Care Inspectorate, Healthcare Improvement Scotland and Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary in Scotland.

It formed part of a new series of inspections being carried out across Scotland.

Care Inspectorate report

They are intended to provide assurance about local partnership areas’ effective operation of adult support and protection processes, and leadership for adult support and protection services.

Inspectors looked at health, police, and social work records of adults at risk of harm.

In their report on Fife’s services, published this week, they said published key strengths were that adults at risk of harm typically experienced improvements to their safety, health and wellbeing due to the collaborative efforts of social workers, health professionals, and police officers

They also said that Partnership leaders promoted a collaborative ethos which led to improved outcomes for adults at risk of harm.

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Inspectors noted that adults at risk of harm played a key role on the adult support and protection committee and a third sector body effectively supported their meaningful participation.

And they found that Partnership leaders exercised sound, collaborative leadership for adult support and protection, and they initiated constructive quality assurance and self-evaluation work.

Some areas were identified for improvement including that the partnership should develop standardised templates for adult protection chronologies, risk assessments, and protection plans, and use them consistently.

It should also adopt the policy that all adults at risk of harm, who require them, should have a chronology, a risk assessment and an accompanying protection plan, whether they have been subject to a case conference or not.

Peter Macleod, chief executive of the Care Inspectorate, said: “The Fife partnership carried out almost all aspects of adult support and protection well.

“Social work staff, health professionals, and police officers worked collaboratively to make sure adults at risk of harm were safe, supported, and protected. “He added: “Management of risk is a critical facet of adult support and protection.

"There was room for improvement for chronologies, risk assessments, and protection plans.”

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