Apple-tising events in Fife this weekend

Members of Kinghorn Community Land Association (KCLA) are launching a programme of apple pressing events.   Volunteers from the KCLA committee will be on the High Street in Kinghorn (next to the dentist across from the memorial) this Saturday (November 2) from 10am until 1pm.
Members of Kinghorn Community Land Association (KCLA) are launching a programme of apple pressing events. Volunteers from the KCLA committee will be on the High Street in Kinghorn (next to the dentist across from the memorial) this Saturday (November 2) from 10am until 1pm.

Kinghorn Community Land Association (KCLA) is launching its programme of apple pressing events beginning this weekend.

Volunteers from the KCLA committee will be on the High Street in town, next to the dentist, across from the memorial from 10:00 am to 1:00 on on Saturday.

If locals have apples in their garden, they are invited to bring them along and help turn them into fresh apple juice.

KCLA runs these events as it has planted lots of apple trees in the community orchard by Kinghorn Loch and the trees are starting to bear fruit.

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The community group is looking forward to pressing the first of the apples and turning them into juice for the community to enjoy.

In 2015 KCLA purchased ten acres of unused land beside Kinghorn Loch on behalf of the local community, through lottery funding.

In 2016 it established a community orchard which now has around 80 fruit trees.

Since then, plans have been drawn up and planning permission granted to create a multi-faith and no-faith eco-cemetery and columbarium –a reliquary for the ashes of the deceased, which are stored within stone niches.

Kinghorn d its surrounding area has a need for burial space and to protect land from further developments - ensuring a balance between the natural and built environment.

The eco-cemetery aims to reduce the impact of burials on the environment.

Instead of being a cemetery with formal paths, headstones and mown grass, burials will be within a wildflower meadow that’s managed to look attractive and benefit wildlife.

It will be an area of tranquillity and peaceful contemplation.

The community group is now in the process of looking at raising the necessary funding to progress work on the site and would welcome support from Kinghorn locals.

Richard Brewster, chairman of KCLA, said: “We’re looking forward to our annual apple pressing events and we are also looking to engage with the community about what we should call the proposed eco-cemetery and columbarium project that we are developing.

“We’re looking for everyone’s thoughts and ideas and if you can’t make it along then please email us at info.kcla@gmail.com.”