Scotland’s first ‘Magic Table’ for dementia sufferers installed in Fife

ONFife Libraries is the first in Scotland to have a Tovertafel or dementia friendly Magic Table.
ONFife Libraries is the first in Scotland to have a Tovertafel or dementia friendly Magic Table.

Kirkcaldy Galleries has broken new ground with the installation of a magic table designed specifically to help people with dementia.

It was installed last month by OnFife Libraries – the first library authority in Scotland to have a Tovertafel, or Magic Table.

Launching the 'Magic Table' are (from left) Michelle Sweeney, Jayne Russell, Samantha MacDougall, Heather Korabiowska from ONFife Cultural Trust

Launching the 'Magic Table' are (from left) Michelle Sweeney, Jayne Russell, Samantha MacDougall, Heather Korabiowska from ONFife Cultural Trust

The Tovertafel is a mounted projector that projects light games onto a table. People can interact with the games using their hands and arms.

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The games have been specifically designed to provide physical, mental, and social stimulation for people with dementia.

The table has been funded with investment from Fife Health and Social Care Partnership.

Louise Bell, service manager, said: “We are delighted to be working with Fife Cultural Trust to enable people living with dementia to access and enjoy community resources such as libraries. We hope this interactive equipment will enable people with dementia and their carers to enjoy quality time together.”

“We can’t wait to have our own “magic moments” with the Tovertafel.

The library is hosting a free drop-in session on Saturday, March 16 from 2.00pm to 4.00pm when people can play the games and enjoy using the table. More dates will be added in the coming months.

Samantha MacDougall, service development officer for ONFife Libraries, said: “The Tovertafel has fantastic potential to improve the lives of those living with dementia in our community.”