Fife offenders creates butterfly mural at children's home as part of community payback

People carrying out sentences in the community brought some colour into the lives of children in a residential home in Fife.

By Darren Gibb
Thursday, 12th May 2022, 5:06 pm
Some of the Community Payback team painting a mural in the garden of a children’s home in Freuchie.
Some of the Community Payback team painting a mural in the garden of a children’s home in Freuchie.

A mural was painted on a wall with help from people completing Community Payback Orders in the garden of a children’s home in Freuchie.

Most Scots see the benefits of someone who’s broken the law carrying out unpaid work as part of a sentence in the community, according to a new poll.

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The findings were revealed in a new YouGov survey of more than 1000 Scottish adults carried out on behalf of Community Justice Scotland (CJS).

The national body is responsible for monitoring, promoting, and supporting improvements to community justice services. Previous research has shown 70 per cent of Scots don’t know what community justice means.

But in the new study, once people understood that a community sentence is where those who have broken the law are held to account and supported to reconnect and contribute to their communities – the majority could see the benefits.

The evidence shows community justice can help people stop breaking the law again leading to fewer victims and safer communities.

Steve Hopton, service manager for Fife, said: “Unpaid work teams led by supervisor James Love created a butterfly mural in Freuchie for a residential home for children to brighten up a wall to the garden play area.

"The design takes inspiration from the local area and the wording 'spread your wings and fly' is to inspire the children. The team who carried out the work enjoyed giving something back to the community by improving the children’s play area.”